summersbrook labradors - choosing a vet
..... or .....
 finding the “right person” for you.

If you’ve never owned a pet before, this can seem something of a daunting task. If you live fairly close to your breeder, the temptation is to use the same Vet - a brilliant idea ....... maybe ..........
Your first “real” appointment with your selected Vet will be to have your new puppy “checked over” as being fit, healthy ... and a fair purchase.

Do you think that it’s a good idea to have this done by the “breeder’s” Vet?

  • Your Vet is going to become your dog’s personal physician and everything that that implies in terms of “bedside manner”, “approachability” and “availability”. harvet
  • How far away is the surgery? 10 miles may not sound very far to go for annual check-ups and boosters - but, in the middle of the night with a sick dog in the back of the car, it can seem like the other side of the world - believe me - I’ve been there!
  • Is there more than one partner in the practice? - or are you going to have to deal with a “stranger” when your Vet’s on holiday?
  • Do they provide a genuine 24 hr “call-out” service?
  • Who do your neighbours use - and what do they think?
  • All this needs to be decided upon before you collect your puppy.
  • Having made your decision, you must make an appointment to have your puppy checked over within a few days of collecting it - very important!

    To find a list of your nearest Vets - visit “Find a Vet” - see links to

........ “Alternative Medicine” ........

  • We view our Vet as a vital / first call / front line / life saving surgeon.
  • For any medium or long term problems, we would start to investigate more natural methods of treatment - both homoepathy and / or acupuncture.
  • To find a practitioner - visit “Natural Animal Health” - see links to
  • Over the years, we’ve seen quite spectacular results in the treatment of pulled muscles and sprains from the use of acupuncture.
  • As dogs grow older, possible ailments such as heart problems and arthritis, can often be alleviated by alternative means. A healthy and well balanced diet forms part of this treatment - and as a preventative.

Just in passing .......

Sadly, your dog can’t tell you that it’s feeling unwell - or what’s wrong with it.

  • Apart from the obvious signs - like refusing food or lying in its bed looking miserable, you need to be always on the lookout for “out of character” behaviour.
  • Never be afraid of making a fool of yourself in front of your Vet. An apparently silly question, or piece of insignificant information could help save your dog’s life.
  • Don’t delay - the sooner your Vet sees your dog - the easier it is to treat any problem.

A story from the owner of one of our puppies ...

“I don’t know if you ever take your dogs to the beach - I have for as long as I can remember, but never before seen anything like this. Yesterday, Boomer and I went to a local beach. A few minutes into our walk, he found a few of the large red jellyfish that are common in this area. He sniffed at one and gave it a few tentative licks before walking away. Within 15 seconds or so, he began to vomit with such a force that I’ve never seen in a dog. As the first spasm eased - the other end took over. I’ll spare the details, other th an to say that it continued for several minutes. By this time, he was in a great deal of distress and unable to walk. He continued to whimper and cough up foam until I was able to get him back to the car. The roads are fairly quiet there, and I was able to get him to the Vet within 30 minutes. By the time we arrived, he’d recovered considerably, and I thought we were wasting the Vet’s time - big black looks as we jumped the queue. I mentioned the jellyfish to the vet in passing, feeling that it must be a red herring (I can’t believe I’ve written that!), but he was convinced that it was the cause of Boomer’s troubles. The toxins can produce an almost immediate effect, similiar to gastroenteritis, and if not treated, can result in liver damage. One steroid injection, scrambled eggs for supper and he’s his lovely normal self again ... .Normal! - so much so that the “darling little chap” pulled the duvet from my bed and dragged it off to the kitchen - at 4:00am!”

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